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Category : Fruit & Berries       Region : Plains ~ Plateau       Rating : 4
(more) Choke Cherry Pudding

Contributor : Added by Administrator

Tribal Affiliation : Shoshone-Bannock Nation

Orgin of Recipe : Offered by Chris ...who says

Type of Dish : Contemporary & Traditional

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Ingredients

  • Flour and water
  • Sugar
  • Chokecherries
  • (oh, a pot and a stove would be nice, too)

Directions

Lightly wash the chokecherries.

Put the lightly washed chokecherries in a pot with some water and boil them.

Now mash them.

Add sugar to taste.

Add as much flour as you need to make it like a slightly runny pudding.

Variations: You can put the chokecherries through a meat grinder to chop up the seeds.

Also, you can do what i prefer (i'm such a weenie!) And strain the seeds out after the chokecherries are boiled. I have found this is the easiest on my teeth.

*** Special Note ***: in our neck of the woods our chokecherries are completely edible- but before someone picks wild berries of any kind they should check to make sure they are edible. A lady i spoke to once from back east said her chokecherries were a different type of berry and were not completely edible. Just a warning- don't want people to get sick.

*** NativeTech Note *** Autumn and wilted leaves, and pits of fruits, contain hydrocyanic acid. Do not eat the raw pits! Elias & Dykeman's 1982 Field Guide to N. Amer. Edible Wild Plants states "Indians ground whole fruits, leached poison from seeds, formed pulp into cakes, and dried them in the sun for sauce and pemmican".


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